Senior Circle Book Club in Granbury, TX welcomes Seven Wings to Glory author Kathleen M. Rodgers

July 14, 2017

Last September I was invited to Senior Circle Book Club in Granbury, TX to discuss my second novel, Johnnie Come Lately. When I mentioned that my third novel was releasing a few months later, they invited me to come back with the new book.

Today I had the pleasure of speaking to this warm and attentive audience. After I read a few passages from the opening pages of Seven Wings to Glory, several members asked questions about my writing process and how long it took me to write my third novel. One lady was curious about the title. I got a kick sharing how the title came to me in a dream.

I enjoyed telling the group how my first novel, The Final Salute, was a sixteen year effort and ended up being featured in USA Today and The Associated Press.

We also talked about two of my favorite subjects: dogs and the military. A few of the women in the group came up to me later to tell me about their loved ones who’ve served in the Armed Forces. One lady who’s not pictured in the photo remembers her early childhood when her family lived on land which is now part of Fort Hood, the massive Army post located in central TX.

After my talk, I signed books and we enjoyed some delicious refreshments. Many thanks to Cory Johnson, Director of Senior Circle, for making the arrangements to have me back for the second visit. 

 

                                                               Happy reading,

                                                                   Kathleen

Second Thursday Book Club discusses Seven Wings to Glory

July 13, 2017

With members of The Second Thursday Book Club at Mary Lou Reddick Library, Lake Worth, TX. Director Lara L. Strother is second from left. Three members at the discussion are missing from the photo.

Members of the “Second Thursday Book Club” at the Mary Lou Reddick Library in Lake Worth, Texas, rolled out the red carpet and welcomed me for a lively discussion about my third novel, Seven Wings to Glory. We also talked about its predecessor, Johnnie Come Lately. After I read a couple of brief passages from both novels, I took questions from the members. As an author, it’s thrilling to be in the company of a group of readers and listen to them discuss your characters as if they are real people. 

Two of the members, Dolly and Emma, both have close ties to the Grapevine, TX area where I set my fictional town of Portion. Emma grew up on a farm which is now buried under Lake Grapevine (Portion Lake in the story). Dolly remembers attending barbecues as a child on land now under water. Several members of the book club went back and read my first novel, The Final Salute, after reading the other books. 

With Barbara who originally hails from Roswell, NM

As a native New Mexican now living in Texas, I was thrilled to learn that one of the members (Barbara) is from Roswell, NM. I was presented with a bouquet of flowers after the discussion. 

A huge thanks to Lara Strother, Director of the Mary Lou Reddick Public Library, for the invitation. I appreciate my dear friend,  Drema Hall Berkheimer, author of Running on Red Dog Road, for recommending me.

 

 

Happy Reading,

Kathleen

 

 

Dogs of Summer

July 8, 2017

Jav and Denton drinking from the same source.

Dogs play an important role in my life and in the lives of my fictional characters. All of my dogs have served as inspiration for my canine characters in my last two novels, Johnnie Come Lately and Seven Wings to Glory

I’m working on my fourth novel and soon a new canine friend will appear to show my characters the way. 

Pets and books: they’re always there for you.

Happy reading!

Kathleen

Walking in the footsteps of my grandmother (a Harvey Girl) at the Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, New Mexico

May 20, 2017

The Castaneda, a Fred Harvey hotel, opened in Las Vegas, NM 1899.

For years I longed to visit the historic Castaneda Hotel located next to the railroad tracks in Las Vegas, New Mexico. My maternal grandmother, Olga Berg, left the security of her Iowa home in 1928 and came to Las Vegas, NM to work as a Harvey Girl for the Fred Harvey Company. She spent two years at the Castaneda before transferring to the Harvey House in Belen, NM, now home to the Harvey House Museum. She also worked special functions at the La Fonda in Santa Fe and the Alvarado in Albuquerque.

In the lobby of the historic Castaneda Hotel with Kathy Hendrickson of Southwest Detours
Hotel lobby. Train passengers entered from the doors on the far right.

 

 

 

 

 

Grand staircase in lobby

 

 

 

Thanks to Kathy Hendrickson of Southwest Detours, I got to walk in Olga’s footsteps and imagine what it was like to be a young girl far from home, donning the starched black and white uniform, and serving hungry train passengers at all hours of the day and night. With my husband Tom by my side, we entered the hotel lobby with our tour guide and stepped into the past.

My grandmother, Olga Berg, sixth from left. Look for the deep-set eyes.

While Tom and Kathy Hendrickson chatted at the long counter, I was pulled across the room by a lone black and white photograph hanging on a wall to my right.

Olga Berg, second from left.

 

 

 

As I approached the photograph, my heart began to race as I honed in on the Harvey Girl with deep-set eyes and a quiet smile in the center of the photograph.

 

Dining hall awaiting renovation.

I knew instantly it was Olga, my beloved grandmother! But just to be sure, I whipped out my cell phone and took a picture and sent it to my mother back in Clovis, NM. Within seconds, Mother texted back and said she was certain the young woman was her mother. I also sent the photograph to my two sisters and both of my grown sons. We all agreed the young woman had to be Olga.

Dining hall from days gone by. Note the hardwood floors.

I spent the rest of the tour thinking about my grandmother and wishing I’d asked her more questions about her days as a Harvey Girl before she married a railroader and became the mother of a daughter and two sons.

Lunchroom where train passengers stepped off the train and were served immediately by attentive Harvey Girls.

 

 

 

Olga Berg Lamb passed away on March 17, 1978. Until her last breath, she was always waiting on others and she knew the proper way to set a table.

Back staircase used by staff.

As we walked up and down stairs and entered quiet rooms now occupied by ghosts of the past, I tried to tap into the Harvey Girl spirit. These women were more than glorified waitresses working at trackside lunchroom counters and dining halls across the west. They were risk takers! I wish I had half their gumption.

 

In the kitchen. Check out that giant mixer!

 

Author’s note: The Castaneda is currently under renovation. One day soon, this grand dame will shine again and welcome travelers looking for comfortable lodging and a link to the past when passenger trains ruled.

On the veranda after we took our private tour.

Olga’s younger sister Nellie Berg answered the Fred Harvey call and came to New Mexico and Arizona years later to work as a Harvey Girl. A large photo of Nellie graces the museum in Belen, NM.

On the veranda leading from the tracks to the hotel lobby.

To learn more about the young women who worked for Fred Harvey, I highly recommend The Harvey Girls: Women Who Opened the West, by Lesley Poling-Kempes and Rosa Walston Latimer’s series of books, starting with Harvey Houses of New Mexico (Kansas, Texas, and soon-to-be Arizona).

Former Clovis resident Kathleen M. Rodgers to read from her latest novel at Clovis Carver Public Library

Update: June 5, 2017

 

Date: Friday, May 12, 2017

Time: 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Location: Clovis Carver Public Library

Location Address: 701 N. Main St. Clovis, NM 88101

Event Description: I’ll give an informal talk, read a brief passage from my latest novel, Seven Wings to Glory, and host a Q&A session. 

While I’m not allowed to sell books on the premises, readers can order online in advance, and I’ll be happy to sign their copies. Books are available at Amazon, B&N, Target, and Indie Bound. I also hear that a fella in a big white Suburban out in the parking lot may have a few copies on hand. 😉

On Saturday, May 13, I’ll be receiving The Purple Pride Hall of Honor Award for “Sports and Entertainment” from the Clovis Municipal School Foundation. This is a huge honor, and I’m grateful to be nominated. My writing career began my junior year as a student writer on the high school newspaper, The Purple Press

Hope to see you at the library,

Kathleen 

(CHS Class of 1976)

“A nuanced portrayal of military connectedness…. Rodgers writes convincingly of relationships, foibles and struggles. Johnnie’s worry over her son is particularly tangible, informed by Rodgers’ experiences as the mother of a deployed soldier…. In Seven Wings to Glory, the author has created a satisfying story, one that reveals the variety of military family experiences.” 

—Terri Barnes for Stars and Stripes

 

My Chat with the hosts of The Writer’s Block on LA Talk Radio

April 29, 2017

If you missed my live interview on The Writer’s Block on LA Talk Radio, you can tune in to the archived edition where I chat with radio host Jim Christina and his co-host Russ Avison. We discuss my latest novel, Seven Wings to Glory, and about writing in general. Great fun.

I’m also glad I had the opportunity to talk about our military and veterans. BTW, Jim Christina is a Vietnam Vet and Purple Heart recipient.

You can purchase the novel here:

Amazon

B&N

Target

Indie Bound

 

 

“Passing 50” Radio Host Robin Boyd chats with Kathleen M. Rodgers about writing

April 13, 2017

“Why worry about each passing decade? Let’s celebrate our voices of experience!” ~ Robin Boyd, host of Passing 50

Join Robin and me for a lively discussion about the writing process and my latest novel, Seven Wings to Glory, on her new radio talk show, Passing 50. It’s always an honor when the person conducting the interview has read your work. To listen to the interview, click on the show’s homepage and our interview appears to the right under the title Seven Wings to Glory

Have a great day.

Kathleen

 

 

Photos from Seven Wings to Glory book launch at B&N, Southlake, TX

April 9, 2017

 

Signing a copy of my third novel, Seven Wings to Glory, for the one and only Parris Afton Bonds, my writing mentor since 1984 when she was the keynote speaker at a special luncheon at the Fort Hood Officer’s Club. Parris is a NYTs bestselling author of over 40 novels. She co-founded Romance Writers of America with her dear friend, Rita Clay Estrada. This superstar writer raised 5 sons.

 

Patron of the arts Tom Rodgers and NYTs bestselling author Parris Afton Bonds meet each other for the first time after they’ve both been encouraging my writing for years. A sweet moment I will always cherish. Parris showed up with beautiful flowers.

With Tom and Brian (a super cool manager at B&N in Southlake, Tx) who is a proud military brat and also served as a pararescuman in the Air Force. Their motto is “That others may live.” 

 

 

 

Longtime church friend Tari Sanchez Bauer stopped by with her daughter Mandie. Tari’s bookclub read my second novel, Johnnie Come Lately, and they were such a welcoming group.

Janet Terneus, a loyal reader who loved Johnnie Come Lately, grabbed a signed copy of my latest. 

 

With good friend Joyce Hegeman, a fun-loving gal and fellow pilot’s wife. And dog lover, too.

 

Neighbor and friend Kathi Marrs (a military mama), Katherine Boyer (Retired Library Director of Roanoke Public Library) and dear author friend Drema Hall Berkheimer.

 

 

Rhonda Revels (far right) and our mutual friend Leisa Price Rintala. What a glorious day. Rhonda has supported me through three novels…My sons grew up thinking of her as a second mama.

 

Beverly Logan Jones and I finally met in person after being FB friends the past couple years. We have a mutual friend Wendel Sloan and she wanted to make him jealous. LOL Beverly drove in from Mt. Vernon, TX.

 

 

With my best friend from high school, Sherry Dodson Christian, and my best friend Rhonda Revels (since 1992). What a joyous moment! Sherry surprised me. She snuck up and sat down next to me while my head was turned. I had no idea she was there or that she was coming to the launch.

Always fun to connect with FB friends in person. Loved meeting Julianne Hart and her writer friend Scherry Lewis who says she’s been wanting to meet me for a long time. Thank you, ladies.

 

 

Four authors in a row…L-R Parris Afton Bonds, Jan Marler Vanek, yours truly, and Jerry Gundersheimer.

 

With longtime writer friend Melissa Embry. Mellisa went to a writers conference at Tarrant County College/NE campus and stopped by to say hi before heading home clear across the metroplex.

 

 

Jerry Gundersheimer, author of the new novel Face of the Bell Witch. Jerry and I have been FB friends for over a year and he drove all the way from Sherman, TX to meet me. Wow, so honored! Such a cool guy!

 

Family support from son Thomas, DIL Brittany, and Tom.

*Special thanks to B&N Community Relations Manager Casey Dickey for setting up the event.

 

Watercolors Inspired by Seven Wings to Glory

April 2, 2017

Seven Little Girls by Jenny Zovein
Mama’s ’59 El Camino at Johnnie’s House by Jenny Zovein
Mama at War Memorial by Jenny Zovein (Johnnie Come Lately & Seven Wings to Glory), published by Camel Press.

 

Early in the writing of my third novel, Seven Wings to Glory, I reached out to watercolorist, Jenny Zovein, whose work I’d admired on Facebook. Her whimsical style appealed to me and I wondered if she could paint a few scenes to inspire me as I worked to bring the story to life.  She agreed and we arranged a time to discuss the project by telephone. Each time she sent me a completed painting, I propped it up in front of my computer and felt the spirits of my characters come to life.

To see more of Jenny’s work, please visit her art page on Facebook.

Seven Wings to Glory is published by Camel Press and is available in print and e-book at most online booksellers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Seven Wings to Glory by Kathleen M. Rodgers: a Columnist Exposes Her Town’s Racist Past

April 1, 2017

My third novel, Seven Wings to Glory, releases today from Camel Press. The novel is a sequel to Johnnie Come Lately but can be read as a standalone story. The book is available at Amazon B&N and most online booksellers.

Endorsements and additional buying information can be found on my publisher’s website.

#MilitaryFamilies #Racism #MagicalRealism #Faith

 

New Book Release from Kathleen M. Rodgers

Dear Readers, Friends, and Family,

I’m excited to announce the April 1, 2017 release of my third novel, Seven Wings to Glory, published by Camel Press. Sometimes small towns harbor big secrets. And sometimes things just can’t be explained. Early praises are coming in from top authors around the country. To read their endorsements, please visit my website.

The print edition will be available on Amazon, B&N, and other online retailers April 1. The Kindle and Nook editions are out now.

You can ask your local bookseller or library to order the book. If you’re a member of a book club, I hope you’ll consider choosing Seven Wings to Glory for a future discussion.

The official book launch will be held at B&N, Soutlake, TX, Saturday, April 8 from 2-4 pm CDT.

All the best,

Kathleen

Johnnie Kitchen is finally living her dream, attending college and writing a column for the local paper. She adores her husband Dale and chocolate Labrador Brother Dog, and they reside in a comfortable home in the small town of Portion in North Texas. Their three children are thriving and nearly grown.

But Johnnie is rattled when her youngest boy Cade goes to fight in Afghanistan. The less frequent his emails, the more she frets for his safety. On the home front, Johnnie learns that Portion is not the forward-thinking town she believed. A boy Cade’s age, inflamed by a liberal bumper sticker and the sight of Johnnie’s black friend Whit, attacks them with the N-word and a beer bottle. After Johnnie writes about the incident in her column, a man named Roosevelt reaches out with shameful stories from Portion’s untold history. More tears and triumphs will follow, as Johnnie’s eyes are opened to man’s capacity for hate and the power of love and forgiveness.

 

Copyeditor Joyce Gilmour talks about her job in the 2017 March/April issue of Southern Writers Magazine

March 4, 2017

You can read my complete interview with copyeditor Joyce Gilmour  by subscribing to Southern Writers Magazine. The magazine is a great resource for both authors and readers and is available in print, online, and digital editions.

Editing TLC

 

 

Johnnie Come Lately Short Listed for Somerset Book Awards

February 11, 2017

My second novel, Johnnie Come Lately, moved up from finalist to the short list and is in the final rounds of judging for the 2016 SOMERSET Book Awards novel competition for Literary, Contemporary, and Mainstream Fiction. The Somerset Book Awards is a division of Chanticleer International Book Awards and Novel Writing Competitions.

The sequel, Seven Wings to Glory, releases from Camel press April 1, 2017. The novel can be read as a standalone story.

As an American novelist, I realize it’s a privilege to write fiction. I never want to take my freedom of expression for granted.

 

 

Casualties: A compelling and convincing read by debut novelist Elizabeth Marro

February 2, 2017

“His war is over. Hers has just begun.” ~ from the book jacket of Casualties, published by Berkley Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC

What others are saying:

“… this powerful first novel will leave the reader reflecting for days. – Library Journal 

“Marro’s perception of the hurt and guilt her characters carry is deftly portrayed… Marro provides a clear sense that, while the past can’t be undone, the future always offers a chance to make amends, and the human spirit can triumph over pain and find hope in family and forgiveness. Marro casts a ray of hope that a good life can be lived after terrible tragedy.” Kirkus Reviews

“Elizabeth Marro made me care about these two people so much that by the end of the novel I’d forgotten they were fictional characters and I was ready to call them up to see how they were doing and if they’d finally found their way toward peace and forgiveness.”—David Abrams, author of Fobbit.

To find out how to win either an E-book or signed hard copy, read on.

Q&A with the author:

Kathleen M. Rodgers: Welcome, Elizabeth. I must admit, as a military mother whose youngest son served in combat, I approached your novel with some trepidation. From the book’s description, I knew going in that Robbie, a Marine fresh home from the war, was going to break his mother’s heart. In breaking Ruth Nolan’s heart, he broke mine as well. And yet, I couldn’t stop reading. Without giving too much of the plot away, can you describe how the story first came to you?

Elizabeth:

I knew this story would be about a mother, her son and one of the scariest “what if” questions that keeps parents awake at night. I didn’t know until we moved to San Diego in 2002 that it would be about a mother whose son goes to war. My husband and I had been living and working in central New Jersey, an area dominated by the pharmaceutical industry and other corporations. We knew few people whose immediate family were in the military. My own family’s involvement in the military ended with my father’s generation. Now we were in a city that many think of as a sunny escape to paradise but is one of the largest military communities in the country. Here we saw the recruits come in, the families waving goodbye, the pews in church occupied by one less family member as troops were deployed. Then we began to read the names of the fallen in our local newspapers and see the photographs that went with them. Each of those names led to a family whose lives would never be the same. It became important to me to try to understand their journey.

KMR: The story alternates between three point-of-view characters. First we meet military mother Ruth Nolan, an affluent executive who works for a major defense contractor. Next comes Robbie, back on American soil after fighting in Iraq. After tragedy strikes, we meet Casey MacInerney, a wounded warrior and con artist with a heart of gold. All three characters are equally convincing in their roles. How did you get inside the heads and hearts of your main characters to create story people readers care about, enough to still worry over them days after finishing the book?

EM: It’s wonderful when characters stay with you, isn’t it? I think part of it is that I lived with these people for a very long time. I had conversations with them, asked them questions, and sent them down blind alleys a few times. After all that you find you have them or, more accurately, they have you. You hear them in your dreams. They start telling you what happens. Some opened up much more easily than the others. Casey, for example, came quickly and easily. Robbie was also accessible in a way that his mother, Ruth, was not for a long time. I think that to crack to code for each of them — particularly Ruth. Initially, I was a harsh judge of Ruth but writing isn’t about judging. It’s about understanding. When I wrote a number of scenes about Ruth’s childhood that never appear in the story, I recognized her vulnerabilities in a way I couldn’t before.

KMR: Casey’s character is so authentic, not only with his war injury but his need to find a loved one he’d abandoned years ago. By the end of the story, I felt complete empathy for him due to the physical and mental anguish he’d suffered. I wanted him to be happy. Did you interview wounded warriors who’d lost limbs?

EM: Casey emerged not from interviews but from piecing together elements of men I’d observed and imagined. His conflicts stem only partly from losing part of his leg in the first Gulf War. He is shaped as much by his upbringing, the losses he’d had over the course of his life, and his need for family which is complicated by his conviction that he doesn’t really deserve that kind of love. Having a feel for who he was before the injury helped me to understand how his injury and the events that followed could land him in the situation he was in when he met Ruth.

 KMR: Casey’s love of reading and his respect for books turns what could be a cliché down-on-his-luck-character into a well-rounded person. Why is reading so important to the development of a person regardless of his or her background?

EM: As a lifelong book addict, I’m very aware of how stories have opened the world to me. They challenge me, they help me to go places and meet people I’d never otherwise meet, they help see life a little more fully. Books are also a refuge, a place to go and live for a while and to come back with a fresh perspective. Knowing Casey the way I did, I knew he’d not want to sever every connection he had with who he’d been as a promising younger person.

KMR: Is your book an indictment against war?

EM: I’ve never thought of it that way for the simple reason that I’m focusing on people, not an agenda. There are very human universal issues at stake for the characters in this story and war is one of them. Human history seems to be inextricably bound with war and I venture to guess that most of us all over the world would like to see less of it. The consequences of going to war are tremendous and far-reaching. It is important for as many of us as possible to recognize and feel those consequences on our youth, families, and communities. It is important for those of us who do not serve to recognize what we are asking those who serve to do on our behalf. We need to do what we can to be sure we are going to war for the right reasons and make sure the needs of our veterans and military families are met. And we must consider the consequences suffered by the civilians living in war zones whose lives are affected for generations.

KMR: Ruth drives an expensive jaguar. It’s sleek and represents the trappings of her well-heeled life. But later, after days on the road, the jaguar begins to show signs of a long journey. Then near the end of the story, you gift the reader with an image of the hood ornament and the symbol becomes a metaphor for the possibilities awaiting both Casey and Ruth. During the writing of the novel, did you ever find yourself wanting to take a road trip and travel the exact route of your characters?

EM: Yes! In fact, I’ve driven portions of this trip but not the whole of it. I’d love to do the whole thing some day.

KMR: I finished the last pages of your novel with a tissue pressed to my nose. When Ruth turned onto Lost Nation Road, I found myself wanting to be alone as she pulled up in front of the house she grew up in. The ending was quite satisfying and I can imagine life continuing on in this fictional world you created. Will there be a sequel?

EM: There are no plans now for a sequel. We may catch glimpses of Ruth or Robbie or Casey and his daughter in future stories about other people.

KMR: What are you working on now?

EM: I’m working on my next novel, a few short stories and some essays. The novel, as it is currently evolving, is a complete departure from Casualties.

KMR: Can you talk about your process? Did you plot out the novel chapter-by-chapter, scene-by-scene, or did you scribble a few notes and let the characters lead you on their journey?

EM: I tried everything with Casualties. I wrote thousands of pages and threw out hundreds. One thing that seems to be true for me: nothing happens unless I understand my people first. I have the basic story for my next novel but before I plot it out extensively, I want to make sure of them. That way, they can help me fill in the parts I don’t know.

KMR: Do you revise as you go or do you complete a first draft straight through and then go back and revise?

EM: I start with messy scenes and fragments, see what I’ve got, then write a draft. Then another draft, Then another one. Lots of drafts, lots of revisions. About half way through my work on Casualties, I threw out about 600 pages and was left with the last scene and a few disconnected chapters. That was the moment that got me closest to the book that was finally published.

KMR: What advice can you give writers who are struggling to write a book, be it fiction or nonfiction? Most writers deal with self-doubt about their work. How do you push through it and get your work done, especially if you’re working on a story without a deadline?

EM: There is always a deadline in my mind. I have only so many years on this planet and I want to use them as well as I can. Writing is an important part of that. These days, I feel worse when I’m not writing than when I’m struggling. Self-doubt comes with the territory. There is no getting away from it. I try to treat it as I would an itch or a cold, something temporary to be endured. The best medicine for self-doubt are writing friends who can listen and urge you on. Give yourself permission to write really awful stuff on days when it isn’t coming. Chances are you’ll stumble on a line that gets you to where you want to go the next day. Writing is like anything we’ve done in life and there is a way to draw confidence from that. We weren’t born experts in anything we’ve had to learn to do. We’ve had to figure it out, do it, practice some more. I say try anything – meditation, walking, screaming but sit down and write what you can each day even with the self-doubt riding on your shoulder.

KMR: At what age did you proclaim, “I am a writer?” Are there other writers in your family? 

EM: I was pretty young when I had dreams of writing but I was sixty when my book was published. I credit two teachers with spurring me in the direction of actually putting pen to page. The first was my third grade teacher Sister Maureen James and the second was my English teacher in high school. I wrote a story that made Sister laugh and then, later, an essay that my English teacher praised. There is at least one other member of my extended family in the business. My cousin Megan Mulry has written a series of women’s fiction novels and erotica. There may be others. I’ll start asking around! I do come from a family of die-hard readers and nothing fosters the desire to write more than reading.

KMR: You mention your ten siblings in your acknowledgements. I come from a family of six kids; I’m the third one down. I jokingly tell people I became a writer to have a voice. What role, if any, did growing up in a large family play in your becoming a writer?

EM: I’m the oldest of five and, later, my mom married a man with six kids. While still at home was always escaping into my own world. I read, I made up stories that I told to myself. I was the kid who would nod at everything my mother said while hearing nothing over the sound of my own thoughts and imaginings. I was the one who would disappear into the bathroom with a book when it was my night to do the dishes because the dishes could wait but the story I was reading could not.

KMR: When did you take up walking and how does it affect your writing? Do you go for long strolls or do you power walk to get your heart rate up? Do you have a walking partner?

EM: I began to walk in a serious way a couple of years ago. Until then, it had been something I did with my dogs (a lovely way to walk), but not a way of actually getting anywhere or of seeing anything. I gave myself a goal in 2015 to walk 800 miles for the year. I never came close but I did develop a habit that has led to so many wonderful things for me and my writing. I stroll and walk fast. I look for hills but my favorite thing is to walk the cliffs near my home and see what is new that day. I enjoy walking with others but I walk most often alone and I enjoy that too. I don’t walk with earphones in my ears and I try to notice something new each time.

Special OFFER:

To celebrate the first anniversary of Casualties, Betsy is offering a free copy of her novel to my readers. Winners can choose between a signed hard copy or a free e-book on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or iBooks. To enter, comment below before midnight on Monday, February 6. The drawing will be held on Tuesday, February 7.

BIO:

Elizabeth (Betsy) Marro is the author of Casualties, a novel about a single mother and defense executive who loses her son just when she thought he was home safe from his final deployment. Now she must face some difficult truths about her past, her choices, the war, and her son. A former journalist and recovering pharmaceutical executive, Betsy Marro’s work has appeared in such online and print publications as LiteraryMama.com, The San Diego Reader, and on her blog at elizabethmarro.com. Originally from the “North Country” region of New Hampshire, she now lives in San Diego where she is working on her next novel, short fiction, and essays.  Casualties, published in February 2016 by the Berkley imprint of Penguin Random House, is her first novel.

 

 

 

Author Kathleen M. Rodgers signs with Nine Speakers, Inc.

January 25, 2017

Some good news:

 I’m delighted to announce that Diane Nine, President of Nine Speakers, Inc. based in Washington, D.C., will represent my future work. Now it’s time to get busy and write my fourth novel. A huge thank you to Deborah Kalb for making the connection. Deborah is the author of The President and Me: George Washington and the Magic Hat and Haunting Legacy: Vietnam and the American Presidency from Ford to Obama, which she coauthored  with her father, renowned journalist Marvin Kalb.

Many thanks to all of you who’ve believed in me over the years. The journey continues…