Baby Bailino: Long Island Author of the Year Dina Santorelli pens another thriller full of heart and soul

December 13, 2016

What others are saying about Baby Bailino, a follow-up to Baby Grand

“Dina Santorelli writes a terrific thriller. Baby Bailino will grip you to the end—and long after.”

—Andrew Gross, New York Times best-selling author of The One Man

“Dina Santorelli has done it again—delivering a taut thriller with believable, flesh and blood characters and a story that stays with you.”

—Anne Canadeo, best-selling author of the Black Sheep Mysteries

Book Summary:

It’s been two years since Jamie Carter escaped captivity and saved Charlotte Grand, the infant daughter of New York Governor Phillip Grand, becoming a national hero for foiling the kidnapping plot that incarcerated reputed mobster/entrepreneur Don Bailino—the man who abducted and raped her. As Governor Grand considers his candidacy for U.S. president, Bailino inexplicably escapes from prison, and soon Jamie’s fifteen-month-old daughter, Faith—Bailino’s biological child—disappears. Jamie sets off to find her and, in the process, finds an unlikely ally in Bailino, who is on the run not only from the FBI but from members of organized crime who have a score to settle. Can Jamie trust the man who once held her prisoner? Can she rely on her instincts? And can she again find the strength to save a child when, this time, that child is her own?

My thoughts on this well-crafted story:

Dina Santorelli’s Baby Bailino kept me in a quandary from the moment I started reading until the very end: at times I wasn’t sure who to root for. Just when I thought I had the characters figured out, along came another twist and turn in an action-packed thriller full of heart and soul. Sometimes the “bad guy” might turn out to be your favorite character. As I read the last lines in this incredible story, I smiled to myself with a deep sense of satisfaction at the way things turned out.

Q&A with the author:

Kathleen: Baby Bailino is a sequel to your debut novel, Baby Grand. Was writing the sequel easier or more difficult than the first book? How long did it take you to write both books?

DS: Although it took the same amount of time to write the first drafts of both books (about a year and a half), I found writing Baby Bailino easier in one sense and more challenging in another—easier in that I felt like I was really comfortable with the characters already and felt an immediate connection, like I was reuniting with family and friends, and more difficult in that I felt the pressures of sequelhood—not wanting to repeat too much for those who read the first book, but knowing that I needed to acclimate new readers to the story. I always was conscious of that fine line between telling too much and telling too little.

KMR: Can people read the sequel if they haven’t read Baby Grand? In other words, can Baby Bailino be read as a standalone book?

DS: Yes. I wrote the sequel so that it can stand alone. However, readers of the first book will certainly get a fuller and more satisfying read—they know the backstory of these characters and bring that knowledge to the new plot.

KMR: What advice can you give writers who are struggling to write a sequel? How do you decide how much backstory to include in the second book?

DS: Oh, that’s the million-dollar question! I wish I knew.  I just try to include enough backstory so that new readers don’t feel completely lost. I find writing to be such a go-with-your-gut kind of endeavor. Whatever feels right, I try to do and hope for the best.

KMR: Do you revise as you go or do you write the first draft straight through and then go back and revise?

DS: Oh, I revise as I go. My modus operandi is to write a chapter or so at one sitting, and then at the next sitting look over what I did the session before, edit, and then go on to new material from there.

KMR: Early in the sequel, there are some fast-paced scenes that take place inside a prison. As a reader, I was pulled along with my heart in my throat. Without giving too much away, can you describe how you created this realistic setting? Did you visit a prison or talk to former inmates before you wrote this section?

DS: Actually, I made the entire thing up! For me, that’s the best part of being a fiction writer—just using my imagination. Because I’ve been a journalist for more than 25 years, I have always been tied to facts—getting descriptions right, getting attributions right. I feel so much freer as a novelist. I can do whatever I want!  That’s not to say that I don’t like to mix a little fact into my fiction. I think when novelists incorporate factual information it makes their works more believable. For instance, when I mention that Phillip Grand (fictional character) had a photo of Barack Obama (real person) on a table, that helps tie Phillip to a certain place and time that is real. I like doing that. But to write the prison scenes, I just tried to tap into that imagination and take the reader on a really interesting ride. I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

KMR: At what age did you proclaim, “I am a writer?” How did you get your foot in the door at publications like CNN and Newsday?

DS: I’ve always felt like a storyteller. Feeling like an actual writer came later. When I was in my teens, my head was full of stories, but I didn’t think my writing was good enough to make those stories come alive. It took more than twenty years as a journalist—working on my writing every day, learning how to make observations every day, meeting new and interesting people every day—to hone my craft. By telling other people’s stories, I learned how to tell my own.

Getting my foot in the door at any publication or with any new client meant getting myself to a place where I had enough experience to show I could do the job. I wrote for many publications and outlets that paid terribly and had small readerships, but I didn’t care; I wanted the experience and the clips for my portfolio. (Turns out, I learned a hell of a lot, as well, working for these publications and made contacts that impacted my career greatly.) Getting my foot in the door also meant hoping that the person/publication I wanted to work with would take a chance on working with someone new. I always say to my students (I teach Continuing Ed. at Hofstra University), “All you need is one person to take a chance on you.” I was lucky enough to have had several.

KMR: Do you attend many writers’ conferences these days? If so, which ones?

DS: The conferences I go to are more about publishing—the business of writing—such as Digital Book World, which I’ll be attending in January.

KMR: What was it like growing up in Queens? As a child, did you and your family go into New York City very often? And did living so close to the city have an influence on your writing career?

DS: I loved growing up in Queens. I was lucky to live with two parents who loved me and a strong friend network. It was really one of those “city” upbringings that you see on television where packs of kids are outside playing handball or punchball or playing tag and Red Rover well into the night. That was us. We all felt like family, and when I see old friends on Facebook, they say the same thing. We loved and protected one another—kind of like the kids on the Netflix series, Stranger Things. That was us, riding bikes and having adventures.

My family and I went to New York City on occasion, but it wasn’t really until I was driving on my own that I would go into Manhattan—“the City,” as we called it—to see plays and shows. I know it’s a cliché, but there really is such an electricity to New York City that is palpable—I still feel it to this day when I go there. It never gets old.

And, oh, yes, living there did have an influence on me! Not only did commuting to Manhattan for work foster my love of reading—I read thrillers by John Grisham, James Patterson, and Michael Crichton on the buses and subway every day—but it is just rich with people and activity. There’s a novel lurking on every corner.

KMR: You and your husband have three kids. How do you juggle family time with your professional duties as a novelist, journalist, ghostwriter, nonfiction author, and Executive Editor of Family and Salute Magazines (distributed at military installations around the country). Do you designate certain days of the week for your editing job and other days for your freelance work? And how do you squeeze in ghostwriting other people’s books on top of writing fiction? I feel like a slacker next to you.

DS: I have no idea how I do it.  I do believe, though, that you can find time for anything you want to do, if you really try. I’m a firm believer in: If there’s a will, there’s a way. To write Baby Grand, the kids were younger and demanded more of my time, so I used to set my alarm for 4 a.m. to write. I’d write for an hour or two, crawl back to bed, and then get up with them for school. It’s all about time management. I’ll designate a morning to working on a nonfiction project and an afternoon to working on a freelance article and then an evening to going out to dinner with my friends. A spiral notebook on my desk is my best friend—I write down all the things I want to get done in a day and then try to do them (my kids make fun of me for not having acclimated to Google Calendar). I may not always get to everything, but I try. Of course, as my children have gotten older, juggling has gotten a whole lot easier—at least until we got our shih tzu.

KMR: Please describe the difference between writing fiction and nonfiction. In your opinion, is one more difficult to write than the other?

DS: To be honest, I’m not sure which is easier or more difficult. Both present interesting challenges. I find fiction to be an all-encompassing kind of writing. When I’m in the throes of writing a novel, I become consumed. The characters follow me around while I’m running errands, trying to sleep, taking a shower. My brain is always trying to piece together threads of plot and dialog. It can be exhausting. It’s like I am in a constant pursuit of authenticity. For nonfiction, it’s less consuming, but just as demanding. Here, too, I strive for authenticity. In a freelance article, my concern is presenting the authenticity of whomever I’m writing about. As a ghostwriter/collaborator, I strive to bring to life the authenticity of the author of the book: Am I capturing his/her voice? Am I conveying what he/she wants to say? Did I nail the lingo? Writing fiction and nonfiction, for me, is all about finding truth, whether it’s mine or someone else’s.

KMR: In a television interview you gave a few years ago, you talked about how most writers deal with self-doubt. How do you push through it and get your work done, especially if you’re working on a story without a deadline?

DS: Ah, the dreaded self-doubt! One of my professors used to call it the “shit bird” that sits on your shoulder and constantly tells you you’re no good. Not fun. How I push through really depends on the day. Some days, I’ll just step away from the computer—I’ll take a walk or take a shower or spend time with my kids. Usually, I’ll do this when I’m feeling particularly frazzled. Other days, I’ll just sit there and push. I usually strive for 1,000 words a day when I’m writing, so I’ll just write and write until I get there, even if I think what I’m writing is awful. I have this saying: Bad writing is better than no writing. Even if I’ve written 500 words of blah, I can usually find one or two gems in there that would not have gotten written if I didn’t push.

KMR: You’ve interviewed several celebrities over the years, both in person and over the telephone. Can you give us a peek into this process? For the most part, are they friendly and accommodating or have you ever dealt with any rascals (male or female)?

DS: Most people are friendly. Usually, they are promoting films or television shows, so I expect them to be, although there have been a few “rascals,” as you describe them. (Being from New York, I would have used another word.) Some of my favorite interviews have been with James Gandolfini (telephone), Paul Reiser (in person), and Norman Reedus (telephone).

KMR: After all these years, is it still thrilling to see your byline on a story for a national publication and on the cover of your books?

DS: Yes! But, to be honest, what’s even more thrilling is when people stop me to tell me how much they’ve enjoyed something I’ve written, especially my novels. It’s one thing to write, but it’s another to connect, and I feel honored that so many readers have taken my characters into their hearts.

KMR: What are you working on now in terms of fiction?

DS: I am currently writing the third book, titled Baby Carter, in the Baby Grand thriller trilogy. I’m planning to publish it in the summer of 2018.

KMR: In closing, is there anything else you want to share about your career?

DS: Yes, not so much about my career, but I’d like to say this to all aspiring writers: Never give up. The road can be dark (and not because you’re nutty and write in the middle of the night like I do) and sometimes you’ll wonder if it’s worth it. It is. Tell your story. Stay tough, and keep on keepin’ on. Sometimes you are the only one who can see a dream, but, really, you is all you need.

BIO:

Voted one of the best Long Island authors for two consecutive years, Dina Santorelli is the author of the award-winning debut novel, Baby Grand—a Runner-up in the 2016 Shelf Unbound Best Indie Book Competition and an Honorable Mention, Genre Fiction, in the 21st Annual Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards. She has been a freelance writer for nearly 20 years and has written frequently about travel, entertainment, lifestyle, bridal, and pop culture. Dina currently serves as the executive editor of Salute and Family magazines for which she has interviewed many celebrities, including Norman Reedus, Vince Vaughn, James Gandolfini, Tim McGraw, Carrie Underwood, Angela Bassett, and Kevin Bacon, among others. She has collaborated on a variety of nonfiction book projects, including Raising Men: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons (St. Martin’s Press, May 2016), I, Spy: How to Be Your Own Private Investigator (St. Martin’s Press, February 2016), Good Girls Don’t Get Fat, The Brown Betty Cookbook, and Bully, and her book Daft Punk: A Trip Inside the Pyramid has been published in several languages. Dina also lectures for Hofstra University’s Continuing Education Department and is a SELF-e Ambassador for the Library Journal. For more information about Dina, visit her website at http://dinasantorelli.com

For another great interview, check out Dina’s Q&A with author and journalist Deborah Kalb.

http://deborahkalbbooks.blogspot.com/2016/09/q-with-dina-santorelli.html

Winner!

Dina Santorelli: 2nd Place, Best Long Island Author, 2013 & 2014 (Long Island Press)

Dina Santorelli: 1st Place, Best Nassau County Author, 2013 & 2014 (The Happening List)

Baby Grand: Honorable Mention, Genre Fiction, 2013 (Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards)

Baby Grand: Top-rated Mystery/Thriller (Amazon Kindle)

Baby Grand: Best-selling organized crime thriller (Amazon Kindle)

 

Baby Grand is available for purchase on Amazon: https://t.co/YCFnttLfy7

Baby Bailino is available for purchase on Amazon: https://goo.gl/JZd5qO

 

Join Dina’s mailing list! http://tinyurl.com/dinasmailinglist

Twitter: http://twitter.com/DinaSantorelli

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dinasantorelliwriter

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/dinasantorelli

Blog: http://makingbabygrand.com

Texas based author Kathleen M. Rodgers’ poetry featured in new exhibit at The Cradle of Aviation Museum, Long Island, NY

Updated August 1, 2015Aviators, Poets and Dreamers @Cradle of Aviation

Three of my poems from the book Because I Fly (McGraw-Hill 2002, edited by Helmut H. Reda), are on display in this new exhibit which asks the question, “Why do we fly?” Most writers dream of getting their books on bestseller lists or made into movies, but how many authors see their work featured in a museum?

Cradle of Aviation  Museum exhibit featuring A Little Boy's Dream

Aviators, Poets and Dreamers runs from July 18th through Labor Day. The exhibit will then travel to libraries across Long Island. A photo of my husband seated in an A-10 cockpit (circa 1980) appears with my poem, “A Little Boy’s Dream,” penned in 1986 when we lived in Alaska.

Kathleen with her husband, Tom Rodgers (retired USAF Fighter Pilot/Commercial Pilot) and Rod Leonhard, Creative Director at Cradle of Aviation Museum, Long Island, NY. A photo of Tom Rodgers seated in an A-10 cockpit, circa 1980) appears with Kathleen's poem, "A Little Boy's Dream" to the far left of this photo.
L-R With my husband, Tom Rodgers (retired USAF Fighter Pilot/Commercial Pilot) and Rod Leonhard, Creative Director at Cradle of Aviation Museum, Long Island, NY. A huge thanks to Rod for selecting “A Little Boy’s Dream,” “The Searcher,” and “To Live To Fly” for the exhibit. Behind me, friend and former fighter pilot Brad “Booger” Hachat’s photo appears next to the poem “The Searcher,” penned in 1987 as a going away gift.

 

kathleenmrodgers' section @Cradle of Aviation exhibitUSAF Capt. Tom Rodgers featured in Aviators, Dreamers and Poets @ Cadle of Aviation Museum JPG

 

 

 

 

To read more about the exhibit, please click here.A Little Boy's Dream by Kathleen M. Rodgers, right of photo

 

Cradle of Aviation Museum

Charles Lindbergh Blvd.

Garden City, NY 11530

General (516) 572-4111

Reservations (516) 572-4066

Summer Hours

Open 7-Days, 9:30-5:00 through Labor DayExhibit at Cradle of Aviation Musuem

 

 

 

With NJ based writer Barbara Castiglia (L) and Long Island based editor/author Dina Santorelli at the museum exhibit. Barbara and Dina have known each other for years and we are all Facebook friends, but this is my first time to meet them both in person.  Barbara drove two hours both ways to come see me.
With NJ based writer and former New Yorker Barbara Castiglia (L) and Long Island based author/editor Dina Santorelli at the museum exhibit. Barbara and Dina have known each other for years and we are all Facebook friends, but this is my first time to meet them in person. Barbara drove two hours both ways to come see me.

#AviatorsPoetsDreamers